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Dark Owl     Publishing

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Our Causes

Shark Angels

Our first order of business as a new company was to acknowledge Shark Awareness Day, July 14, 2020.

We went to Shark Angels to find out what we could do, and lo and behold, we can adopt our own shark!

We rolled a die to decide which one, and it came up Hammerhead! 

His name is Steve, after the late Steve Irwin.

Steve will accompany us to events to help raise awareness that sharks are an important part of the ecosystem,

and we must help keep them safe.

Check out Shark Angels to learn what you can do to help!

Steve will accompany us to events to help raise awareness that sharks are an important part of the ecosystem,

and we must help keep them safe.

We'll also have a donation jar so you can donate to help sharks, too!

In the meantime, check out Shark Angels to learn more!

Fact Sheet from Shark Angels about
THE GREAT HAMMERHEAD SHARK
Sphyrna mokarran
(Printed on the back of the hammerhead image)

Habitat: Great hammerhead sharks are found in warm, tropical and temperate waters worldwide. They can be found in the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans. It has been documented that they migrate to warmer regions during cold months.


Size: Great hammerhead sharks average 12 feet long and weigh about 500 pounds.


Diet: Hammerhead sharks are active predators with a very varied diet, including crabs, lobsters, squid, fish, and stingrays.


Reproduction: Female great hammerhead sharks breed once every two years and give birth to live pups. The size of the litter ranges from 6 to 66 pups. The pups heads are folded when they are first born, the shape of their hammerhead changes as they grow older.


Sharky Fun Facts: Great hammerhead sharks live to be 20 to 30 years old. The unique head shape of the hammerhead is called a cephalofoil. Scientists aren't entirely sure why hammerhead sharks are shaped this way. There are several different theories, including it gives them excellent peripheral vision and that this head shape allows the shark to be more hydrodynamic (or swim better) than other shark species. Unfortunately, due to over-fishing and shark finning, great hammerhead sharks are endangered.